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August 2016

Social monitoring toolbox filled with empty outcomes

Sponsored by SearchContentManagement

In the ongoing battle to capture and retain customers, companies see social media as fertile and unlimited real estate where they can engage audiences, target marketing campaigns and build brand loyalty. While some social monitoring strategies focus on handling customer service issues, many companies now need to take a more strategic approach to gather vital business intelligence. Social media monitoring together with analytics can help create a clearer picture of a company's audience and activities by aggregating data from multiple social channels. Even though most companies recognize the importance of social media monitoring, few organizations have successfully implemented the tools necessary to turn a profit. More than half of respondents to a recent survey say that tying social activities to business outcomes continues to be a difficult undertaking.

This handbook on social media monitoring identifies some of the difficulties and provides suggestions on converting raw data into actionable information to successfully engage audiences, identify prospects and enhance brand awareness. In the first feature, consultant Scott Robinson makes strong comparisons between election campaigns and marketing campaigns, focusing on lessons learned from Barack Obama's first presidential campaign that reached disengaged voters and boosted favorable voter turnout. In the second feature, writer Laura Aberle details the challenges companies face in tackling social media both outside and inside the enterprise, including engaging consumers across multiple channels and using social networking to improve collaboration among employees. And in the third feature, Robinson returns to examine why social monitoring tools with much promise have fallen short of expectations.

Table Of Contents

  • Lessons learned from a presidential campaign
  • Listening is good, but not nearly enough
  • Social monitoring tools suffer from misplaced expectations